Thursday, August 18, 2005

fishy fishy fish; this is quite a tasty dish....

in the glow of elvis costello's voice, thanks to tesco, and on the off-handed comment of a co-worker, i have discovered the meaning of the universe.

Vintery, mintery, cutery, corn,
Apple seed and apple thorn;
Wire, briar, limber lock,
Three geese in a flock.
One flew east,
And one flew west,
And one flew over the cuckoo's nest.

ok, so maybe not the universe but it was a nice thought. what i really found was this site, and it made me think. often faerytales and folk tales, like those in the Brothers Grimm collections, were told to children to "encourage" them to behave and to teach them how to survive in the wilderness.

these stories spread adages like: "don't talk to strangers", "don't take apples from crazy old women", "always pay the piper", and "never trust anyone with a title like grand-vizier". they also shared such useful tips as: if you're wandering in the woods it's a good idea to mark a trail, but don't use bread crumbs, and: learn to recognize the difference between your grandmother and a wolf, it could save your life.

Georgie Porgie, puddin' and pie,
Kissed the girls and made them cry.
When the boys came out to play,
Georgie Porgie ran away.

History: This rhyme refers to the amorous and amoral Prince Regent who became George IV during Regency times in England.

however, from many of the historical notes attached to these and other nursery rhymes, it seems that these rhymes were way to teach children how to make fun of nobles and the reigning monarchy, without them finding out.

perhaps these rhymes are the secret signs of the rebel army of children (must be less than this tall to join) that spread fear and jump-ropes across mediaeval Europe and overthrew many a sandbox-king. i have been looking for solid proof of this army for a long time and though i have long known of it's existence, this is the most significant evidence i have ever come across. AH-HA internet, i shall soon become the most well-renowned archaeologist of my age!

Ring a-round the roses,
A pocket full of posies,
Ashes! Ashes!
We all fall down!

In other news, they found the plague in prairie dogs in north Boulder, CO - this will make many people very happy, because they've spent a lot of legislative time and money over the last 10-15 years trying to figure out just what to to do with these cute little nasty pests.

10 little fish:

Blogger theleftsock swam up to say...

i r teh nooblar. i own joo.
http://www.frozenreality.co.uk/comic/bunny/index.php?id=0

2:04 PM  
Blogger mysfit swam up to say...

yeah - thanks - saw them before - fun stuff

3:02 PM  
Blogger Fence swam up to say...

I've always been a fan of the soldier nursery rhyme "oh soldier soldier won't you marry me" Greatest ending ever :)

6:33 AM  
Blogger tescosuicide swam up to say...

Ok, you're gonna have to come clean about what you're growing out there.

7:36 AM  
Blogger mysfit swam up to say...

oh tesco, whatever do you mean?

this is for you fence:


“Soldier, soldier, marry me,
And I’ll give you a fife and drum.”
“Oh, how could I marry such a pretty, pretty thing (?)
When I hadn’t got no shoes to put on.”

Away she went to the shoemaker’s shop
As hard as she could run,
And got one of the very best sort,
And the soldier, he put ‘em on.

“Soldier, soldier, marry me,
And I’ll give you a fife and drum.”
“Oh, how could I marry such a pretty, pretty thing?
Hadn’t got no coat to put on.”

Away she went to the coatmaker’s shop
As hard as she could run,
And got one of the very best sort,
And the soldier, he put it on.

“Soldier, soldier, marry me,
And I’ll give you a fife and drum.”
“Oh, how could I marry such a pretty, pretty thing?
Hadn’t got no gloves to put on.”

Away she went to the glovemaker’s shop,
As hard as she could run,
And got one of the very best sort,
And the soldier, he put ‘em on.

“Soldier, soldier, marry me,
And I’ll give you a fife and drum.”
“Oh, how could I marry such a pretty, pretty thing
When I hadn’t got no hat to put on?”

Away she went to the hatmaker’s shop,
As hard as she could run,
And got one of the very best sort,
And the soldier, he put it on.

“Soldier, soldier, marry me,
And I’ll give you a fife and drum.”
“Oh, how could I marry such a pretty, pretty thing,
When I’ve got a sweet wife at home?”

10:18 AM  
Blogger Fence swam up to say...

:) Isn't it great. Never bother with soldiers (unless they look like Sean Bean in Sharpe).
I know a slightly different version though.


"Oh, soldier, soldier, won't you marry me,
with your musket, fife and drum?
Oh no sweet maid I cannot marry thee,
for I have no coat to put on.

So off she went to her grandfather's chest
and she brought him a coat of the very very best,
and she brought him a coat of the very very best
and the soldier put it on."


And then he can't marry her because he has no hat, boots, gloves etc. and finally,
"Oh no sweet maid I cannot marry thee,
for I have a wife of my own."


Genius :)

11:37 AM  
Blogger Carl V. swam up to say...

This site has some of the best articles on the history of fairie tales...scroll down to find the list.

http://www.endicott-studio.com/rdrm/index.html

3:16 PM  
Blogger theleftsock swam up to say...

the one flew over the cuckoo's nest link is dead. thought you should know. goodnight.

1:19 AM  
Blogger mysfit swam up to say...

thanks sock, it should be fixed now

cool carl, i'll be sure to chaeck it out

11:21 AM  
Blogger jenn see swam up to say...

may i be excused, i seem to have the plague.

2:44 PM  

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